Lives of the Artists


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  2. by Giorgio Vasari.
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You already recently rated this item. Your rating has been recorded. Write a review Rate this item: 1 2 3 4 5. I got the 4 volume set from the library and read the whole first volume, parts of the 2nd and 3rd and the pretty much all of volume 4 which was almost entirely about Michelangelo because Vasari was one of his BFF's. It's fun if you're into art history or if you're interested in totally non-objective information on art and arti I read most of this when I was in college, studying art history.

It's fun if you're into art history or if you're interested in totally non-objective information on art and artists. Sep 17, Bill Gusky rated it it was amazing. If you care about art it's a must-read. Overall, I quite enjoyed the varied lives depicted by Vasari. However, the more impactful point that I took from this book is Vasari's theories on the development of art.

His prefaces are slightly long winded but they are the parts in which he sets forth his idea of the decline of art and it's eventual rebirth from Cimabue to Titian. My only issues with the book are centred around the translators. I normally don't have an issue with an older style of English but I honestly found this translation Overall, I quite enjoyed the varied lives depicted by Vasari.

I normally don't have an issue with an older style of English but I honestly found this translation irksome and incredibly long winded at points. Phrases could have easily been updated by the editor. There is no translators note so I'm not aware of whether or not this is a special or famous translation. It's such a shame because I was loving the narratives. Besides this the editor provided good footnotes but bizzarely did not include any for Vasari's descriptions of the Academy of Florence. Vasari here writes the definitive historical biographies of the great artists of the Renaissance. His approach is largely to provide a series of anecdotes ostensibly in chronological order rather than a continuous narrative flow as in modern biography, but the events he recounts are always fascinating, sometimes humorous, and frequently insightful.

Most interestingly, he provides a great deal of insight into the mind of the Renaissance and the motivations, desires, and values that underly arguab Vasari here writes the definitive historical biographies of the great artists of the Renaissance. Most interestingly, he provides a great deal of insight into the mind of the Renaissance and the motivations, desires, and values that underly arguably the greatest period in the history of artistic achievement.

If you are interested in Renaissance art, this book will provide a wealth of information to understand and appreciate it better. Jun 30, Caroline added it Shelves: philip-wardbooks , arts. Listened to the Naxos abridged audio version.


  • Lives of the Artists by Giorgio Vasari | devyzuzyvoby.tk: Books!
  • Lives of the Most Eminent Painters, Sculptors and Architects.
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  • It was interesting to me the way he presented artists which was very different than any Art History book I've ever read. Most Modern Art Historians tell you why the artist is important and what he or she did for art but I've never heard it said that this artist's work was so beautiful that you wonder if he is human or if his hand was touched by God -- That's how Vasari presents the artists.

    He puts a lot of his own opinion in the biography of these artists and their works. I really enjoyed reading his opinion because by the third artist I realized that sometimes Vasari's opinion of what was great art was completely different than my own opinions. It made me think that maybe it's because so much has happened in art through the centuries that time and modernism may have changed the way we look at art. It was very interesting. I even read all of the biography of Michalangelo even though he wasn't my favorite artist to begin with, Vasari loved him so much that I think I like Michaelangelo better now.

    I also re-discovered some artists such as Antonio da Corregio and Andrea Mantegna, who I forgot about, though I do not know why. Nov 16, Erik rated it it was amazing. This is my first candidate for the "what if you were marooned on a desert island" list. Apr 22, Karen rated it it was ok. This book is chock full of information of the artists of the Renaissance. I only read sections of it, mostly pertaining to artists whose work I had recently seen on a trip to Florence.

    It's a bit dry, as in, the artist was born, he did this, then he did that, then he died. It does give a good look at how the artists were perceived in their lifetimes for those who are truly invested in this topic. Jun 04, Rose Eccua rated it it was amazing. This book is very amazing!! View 1 comment. Apr 13, Castles rated it it was amazing Shelves: art. When you hold this book on your hand or in your Kindle!

    Not just a collection of biographies, Vasari is surprisingly a good storyteller as well, finding the connections and continuity between the artists and along the years and the development in the arts. This book took me a relatively long time to finish. For all this and more, the importance of this book cannot be stressed enough. May 05, manatee rated it really liked it. I found this book boring when I tried to read it in Texas, but utterly fascinating and indispensable when I read it in my hotel room in Florence.

    It really helped make my vacation in Florence meaningful since I spent four days staring up at art filled cathedral ceilings. Vasari is really just a big gossip,but he really does put things in perspective. Pun intended. He talks about who squandered his money on his terrible wife and who drank a lot ,but he talks about how Cimabue and Giotto started I found this book boring when I tried to read it in Texas, but utterly fascinating and indispensable when I read it in my hotel room in Florence.

    He talks about who squandered his money on his terrible wife and who drank a lot ,but he talks about how Cimabue and Giotto started a new way of seeing things and recovered the art of the past,as well. I discovered this work by accident and am very glad that I did, as it is the bible of Italian renaissance art biography. I learned SO much when I remembered to take my copy along with me to the museums and cathedrals of Florence. Without my trusted friend Vasari,the beautiful art of Florence might have been one gorgeous ,but bewildering jumble.

    Excellent primary source of the lives of famous artists of the Renaissance. This book is divided into three sections which are all lead by a preface explaining Vasari's point of view. Vasari is a firm believer that the Renaissance was one of divine intervention. He often describes these artists in a divine light. God, as the first Architect, the first Artist, bestowed his gift upon these men, resulting in the beautiful art we see today, either in person, in books, or on television.

    Most importan Excellent primary source of the lives of famous artists of the Renaissance. Most importantly, this book does not merely focus on the artists in a formulaic way. We are not merely presented with a list of art these men have done. We are introduced to the lifestyle of their time.

    Ucello, Vasari describes, is a hermit who devoted too much time to perspective. Lippi is a womanizer, escaping a locked room just to have many nights of frivolous fun. Vasari's text is solemn but at the same times, there are these little bits of hilarity that makes this book an overall good read.

    Oct 15, Cassandra Kay Silva rated it liked it Shelves: art , classics. I was hoping a bit more from this ancient gossip. Vasari was not the best of writers. He shows great favoritism to certain artists and a lot of the information was inaccurate. A few interesting stories though I liked hearing of the decoration of the old church. I also have a fascination with Ludovico Ariosto and was interested in the bit about him and Titan. I looked up many of these works online so I could get an idea of what he was describing and felt that some of his descriptions either I was hoping a bit more from this ancient gossip.

    I looked up many of these works online so I could get an idea of what he was describing and felt that some of his descriptions either did not to the work justice or exaggerated features that I found lacking in quality. Still he was one of the earliest to compile information about the renaissance artists and we are lucky to have any writings of these men from a contemporary.

    Giorgio Vasari Paintings, Bio, Ideas | TheArtStory

    View all 4 comments. Aug 16, Tinytextiles rated it it was amazing. This is a book for those interested in the artists of the Italian Renaissance. I have only read about one of the artists--Perugino--whose later paintings are more to my liking for this period of mostly religious work. Vasari's Lives provides a lot of interesting details of the paintings and the artist. My recommendation is to read only one chapter of an artist a month.

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    You will need to refer to the Web sites for pictures of the paintings. Sep 08, Laura Localio rated it liked it. I read this in college while taking a Renaissance History Course. It was a bit of a difficult read for me at least , but interesting if you like historical info about art. A great book to delve into whether you have a love of Italian Renaissance Art or not. An exceptional read. Apr 09, Kiely Marie rated it really liked it Shelves: grad , art-books. I am ready, and willing, to fight anyone about the proper place in art history of Vasari and his Lives, about the facts he got wrong and the "facts" he almost completely made up, about the horrible and lasting effects that his words had on the reputation of certain artists most prominently, Pontormo , about the fact that he worked for Grand just gonna go ahead and mark this as read bc i've come back to this book again, and again, and again over the last two years while studying the Renaissance.

    I am ready, and willing, to fight anyone about the proper place in art history of Vasari and his Lives, about the facts he got wrong and the "facts" he almost completely made up, about the horrible and lasting effects that his words had on the reputation of certain artists most prominently, Pontormo , about the fact that he worked for Grand Duke of Tuscany Cosimo Primo de' Medici with the goal of extolling the virtues of Florentine art and instead formed the art historical canon and the primacy of Florence in art history for the next years Aug 21, Dominic rated it it was amazing.

    As someone in the early stages of learning about art history this book has been a complete revelation. The fact that it was written during the Renaissance, in Florence by a celebrated artist and is about the greatest heroes of that era makes the whole subject come to life in a way I could have never expected. I have been completely fascinated by the detail and first hand accounts of some of these astonishing artists and architects.

    The essential theme and basis of the book is to describe and giv As someone in the early stages of learning about art history this book has been a complete revelation. The individuals described within the book were some of the most gifted and talented individuals to have ever lived and we can see that from appreciating their work, however Giorgio Vasari is able to make them human by sharing their flaws and weaknesses which in the end makes us all human.

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    The realisation that every genius is just flesh and blood was stirring and refreshing. Reading this book while looking at the paintings by the artists in the National Gallery was a cherished project of mine since the last decade.

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    Ill health prevented me from starting it until 2 years ago. I know more about Renaissance Art than I did before and now I'd like to see more of the paintings mentioned in other galleries. Selections were also part of my reading list for the special subject, the Age of Macchiavelli in my honours history degree at the University of Glasgow in the 80s. Again Reading this book while looking at the paintings by the artists in the National Gallery was a cherished project of mine since the last decade. Again my undiagnosed illness stymied my ability to read.

    So this marks another achievement for me and gives me some kind of closure. But for that I'd be much better read and travelled. Still better late than never at all and now I feel great happiness. As for Vasari's style, his biographies of the various artist are intriguing and skillfully sketched as are descriptions of the paintings, sculpture and architecture and how they came into being. Jan 03, Tufriel rated it really liked it Shelves: history , non-fiction , art-history , italy , print-book. The book is written in storytelling mode with a friendly, familiar tone when discussing artists that the author shared a friendship with.

    At times a little gossipy and sometimes draggy when he went into raptures about an artist's talent or a particular piece. Overall, an informative book that I wish I'd known about and read before visiting Italy. I wish the book included pictures of the paintings, sculptures and other artwork that it referred to even though that probably would have tripled its si The book is written in storytelling mode with a friendly, familiar tone when discussing artists that the author shared a friendship with.

    I wish the book included pictures of the paintings, sculptures and other artwork that it referred to even though that probably would have tripled its size. More than ever, it makes me want to view the art that survived today in person now that I know some of the history behind the piece and the painter. The author was also the architect of the Vasari Corridor at the Uffizi Gallery which was featured in Dan Brown's Inferno and was also the reason I visited it. That, I think, makes it all the more interesting. Sep 25, Josh Friedlander rated it liked it Shelves: history-but-not-modern.

    In the beginning there was the void, and then came Cimabue, who taught Giotto, and there, from the endless flatness of High Gothic altarpieces, came the Renaissance. So things appear from this book, which is colourful and opinionated and highly subjective, yet has been utterly formative in our views of Italian Renaissance painting and on the practice of art history. It's also very, very long; I read this as prep for a trip to Florence, and it wasn't a bad idea, but I'm not enough of a hardcore f In the beginning there was the void, and then came Cimabue, who taught Giotto, and there, from the endless flatness of High Gothic altarpieces, came the Renaissance.

    It's also very, very long; I read this as prep for a trip to Florence, and it wasn't a bad idea, but I'm not enough of a hardcore fan to care about all the lesser lights between Giotto and Titian. And my two-volume edition, I believe, was still abridged! It is indeed a privilege to read a book written by a contemporary and compatriot of people we can only admire today. But because it was written so long ago, it is not the kind of book one reads from cover to cover. I enjoy to read the relevant chapter in addition to the artist I am reading about at the time.

    Just as good old movies never looses their charm, in spite of the fact that they certainly lack all the technology and modern movie making techniques available nowadays - it is for just that It is indeed a privilege to read a book written by a contemporary and compatriot of people we can only admire today. Just as good old movies never looses their charm, in spite of the fact that they certainly lack all the technology and modern movie making techniques available nowadays - it is for just that fact that we still enjoy them.

    I love Vasari's slow pace and the absence of drama and tension. A milestone, the first milestone in the history of art. Vasari made an innovative book for art, not only in a formalist way, but also because some of the information he gathered together are precious nowadays and helps us to define one of the most fertiles of italian's art periods. Last but not least, the anedocts are just hilarious, i found myself laughing alone in more than a spot, and it helps when you're reading something that difficult and fullfilled of informations. An obliged passage for e A milestone, the first milestone in the history of art.

    An obliged passage for every art enthusiast. This book will be extremely valuable for people visiting Italy and the associated works discussed throughout the book. I have been fortunate enough to visit some of the works of art discussed in the book. But, without any reproductions or pictures of the artwork This is the abridged version and valuable as an introduction to the art and artists. I will seek the complete version and revisit. May 30, Jessica rated it really liked it. Charming short biographies of Italian artists written by Vasari, who was a student of Michelangelo's.

    Fun anecdotes, flowery descriptions of art many no longer surviving , and bits of religious and ancient philosophy. Lots of artist adoration, sometimes reading like a late Renaissance infomercial. Great to read before a trip to Italy. Oct 29, Nate rated it really liked it. Readers also enjoyed. About Giorgio Vasari. Giorgio Vasari. Giorgio Vasari was an Italian painter and architect, known for his famous biographies of Italian artists. Books by Giorgio Vasari. Trivia About The Lives of the No trivia or quizzes yet.

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