The War of 1812: A Guide to Battlefields and Historic Sites


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Suffice it to say, there is not much digesting of the recent scholarship here. Grant and Jones feature a brief introductory section that very superficially treats political, diplomatic, and cultural topics along with highlights of [End Page ] the fighting on land and sea.

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Beyond that, practically all attention is devoted to the fortifications, strategies, and battles in seven major theaters of the war: the Northwest, Niagara, Lake Ontario, St. Lawrence and Champlain, Northeast, Chesapeake, and Southern. The discussion of each battle and historic site is accompanied with a "What You'll See Today" section that serves as an enticing tour guide for readers who might wish to travel or imagine traveling to the actual places where the action took place. This is the most intriguing feature of the book. We learn, for example, that "the skyscrapers of downtown Chicago now tower above the original site of Fort Dearborn" and only a sculpture, an inscription on a bridge, and a small park recall the Indian massacre of whites that took place there on August 15, And we are helpfully reminded to envision Washington, D.

The authors state, rightly, that we must learn this history "at a basic human level" to "grasp its immense historical importance" Finally, one small suggestion for authors of books of this kind, where artwork in this case, nice reproductions of a number of paintings comprises much of the visual content: provide in the captions, wherever possible, the names of the artists and titles of the paintings.

Here, Grant and Jones take care to list at the back all permission credits for the photographs and illustrations they use, but that is all the reader will find. Project MUSE promotes the creation and dissemination of essential humanities and social science resources through collaboration with libraries, publishers, and scholars worldwide. Forged from a partnership between a university press and a library, Project MUSE is a trusted part of the academic and scholarly community it serves.

Built on the Johns Hopkins University Campus. This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless. It was located on an island in Barataria Bay, south of New Orleans. The residents, a fluctuating population that could grow to 1,, called themselves Baratarians. It was a complete port, with warehouses, taverns, and facilities to outfit ships flying under the dubious flag of the Republic of Cartagena.

Jean Lafitte stayed here, helping ships prepare to raid the seaways and arranging small craft to smuggle the good into New Orleans. There, his brother and other confederates would store and auction the loot. The U. Lafitte has offered his services to the United States, and most historians cite his very real patriotism, but the fear and loathing for the pirate lingered. So in September, a U. Navy flotilla headed for Barataria. The USS Carolina and six gunboats squared off against ten pirate ships that formed a battle line across the bay.

The battle was not much of one; the pirates seemed to be buying for time. This was likely by design, as Lafitte wanted room to negotiate with authorities later and a pitched battle would hardly help that cause. After the pirates fled, the U. Lafitte and his pirates escaped en masse, and soon cut their famous deal with Jackson to supply cannon and men for the looming battle against the British. This battle would be fought after the conflict was officially over, but before they heard about the cessation. The Baratarians influenced the battle against the British disproportionate to their small numbers because of their experience with cannons.

To get to the real spot, take Route 1 all the way to the end of Grand Island. One of the islands you can spy from the park there could double for the pirate colony.

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His brother and business partner was a blacksmith, and any smuggling business relied on horseshoes as much as small boats and large ships. You'll find it in the French Quarter at Bourbon Street. Texans, sensing a trick, would guess the battles of Jacinto or Goliad. But historians would point to a forgotten, savage battle fought 20 miles outside of what is now downtown San Antonio: the Battle of Medina, fought by insurgents seeking Mexican independence from Spain.

Efforts to throw off foreign powers had been a dream of locals and ambitious Americans since the early s, when Napoleonic wars in Europe disrupted trade in the colonies. One of these revolts involved Tejano, Native American, and American volunteers, who in declared a free state under a plain green flag. The leaders called their freedom fighters the Republican Army of the North. They had about 1, soldiers, under the command of Gen. They were the first to claim Texas as an independent political entity—and it cost them. The Spanish crown assembled a force to counter them, with Gen. The rebels marched to meet them, with both sides knowing they would collide south of San Antonio.

Toledo wanted to lure the royalists into an ambush, but his troops were spotted and chased the Spanish. The rebels wound up facing a fortified defensive position in an oak forest. A four-hour battle followed, and the attacking rebels were routed. The Spanish massacred those fleeing and those who surrendered. One of the underlings involved in this merciless activity was Antonio Lopez de Santa Ana, who would command the forces many years later at the Alamo, where prisoners were likewise executed.

Massacres tend to beget massacres and Texans showed little mercy at San Jacinto. It took until for the Spanish to sign a treaty granting Mexico independence. Texas gained independence from Mexico in Amid all the bloodshed and turmoil, the Battle of Medina has been largely forgotten, and its location lost.


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Where to Catch a Glimpse : The best historians can do is pinpoint the Medina battlefield somewhere in the northern Atascosa County, along old Pleasanton Road near the intersection of U. Highway and County Road To get the spirit, drive around the backroads and look for oak groves.

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One of the frustrating things about earlier epochs of warfare is commanders' tendency to line up brave men up and send them headlong into gunfire. This lasted much longer than it should have, well into World War I when machine guns betrayed this this tactic as clearly flawed. The point is, get some cover! Soldiers have known this longer than their commanders. The state did not secede but the slave-owning inhabitants leaned toward supporting the rebel cause — slaves made up nearly 32 percent of the population.

The Missouri State Guard formed to fight the Union and federal forces came in to bring them to heel. They soon found themselves hemmed in by rebels in the area surrounding their headquarters. During the fighting, troops on both sides used bales of hemp to protect themselves from enemy fire. But soldiers of Brigadier General Thomas A. They soaked the bales in a river overnight to make them fire resistant and lined them up in front of the union defenses. The rebels rolled the rectangular bales up the slope, hiding behind the bales as the Union troops blazed away.

The tactic worked and the exhausted Union troops surrendered just before the Confederates made a final charge. But the most interesting artifact is an errant cannonball lodged in the column of the Lexington Courthouse. The cannonball has not actually been there the whole time — an old man in donated it to the county and signed an affidavit stating he collected the cannonball after it fell out of its hole. County officials screwed it into place with iron rods, where it remains.

Book Ideas for the War of 1812, Daniel Boone and More

Colonel Stephen Kearny thought his mission was done. He'd been ordered by President James K. Polk to take California from Mexico who declined to sell it. After a fairly easy seizure of San Diego, Kearny sent most of his command to Sante Fe, thinking the war was over and the U. Soon, he got word that Californios were ready to fight.

When American scouts neared the Californio camped in a village, a barking dog altered them to their presence. Kearny decided to attack, and his men defying his orders to go slowly charged in on horseback. A hail of gunfire drove them back, and the Californio cavalry soon counterattacked. The horsemen were armed with lances while the Americans had sabers.

That extra range ended with 20 American deaths to only one Californio. It was to be the Californios high water mark. After local and U. California now belonged to America. Where to Catch a Glimpse : The good thing about skirmishes, as opposed to large battles, is that the reenactments are easier to get right. With such a small fight, Battle Day is a good chance to remember this slice of California history.

War of 1812: A Guide to Battlefields and Historic Sites

For a more visceral experience, park at the lot away from the monument and take the winding, mile-long foot trail to the monument at the western edge of the park. The Gulf of Mexico is a forgotten battleground of the Civil War. The Union strategy depended on strangling the Confederacy, and that meant controlling the rivers and ports. Mobile, Alabama was a crucial target and taking the forts that protected the city was a longstanding priority.

Even though the U. Navy blockaded the city since summer , it took the entire war to win the city. Fort Blakeley was one place that needed to be taken in order for the city to surrender. Confederate Brig. John Liddell commanded 3, men while the Union had 16, troops moving in on them.

The Union followed the siege textbook: dig trenches to get close enough to the defenses to launch an attack. Confederate artillery and warships did their best to disrupt them with cannon fire. On April 9 the final assault began, with onrushing Union troops tripping landmines and showered with rifle and cannon fire.

Late in the afternoon, the federal troops breached the defenses and the Confederates surrendered after a brief hand-to-hand combat. The Union days later occupied Mobile. The fight is overshadowed by the fact that on April 9 Gen. Robert E. Lee surrendered his army at Appomattox. Where to Catch a Glimpse : The Battle of Mobile Bay takes most of the attention, and rightfully so from a historic and tourism standpoint.

But a visit to the Historic Blakeley State Park is a great companion. Tours bring visitors to the earthworks that formed both Confederate and Union lines.

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The trenches, artillery positions and rifle pits feel like World War I rather than a stereotypical set-piece Civil War battle. They are well preserved and not often visited. Since this was the last great battle of the Civil War, the place has added significance and emotional impact. The war seemed pretty far away from Bly, Oregon on May 5,

The War of 1812: A Guide to Battlefields and Historic Sites The War of 1812: A Guide to Battlefields and Historic Sites
The War of 1812: A Guide to Battlefields and Historic Sites The War of 1812: A Guide to Battlefields and Historic Sites
The War of 1812: A Guide to Battlefields and Historic Sites The War of 1812: A Guide to Battlefields and Historic Sites
The War of 1812: A Guide to Battlefields and Historic Sites The War of 1812: A Guide to Battlefields and Historic Sites
The War of 1812: A Guide to Battlefields and Historic Sites The War of 1812: A Guide to Battlefields and Historic Sites
The War of 1812: A Guide to Battlefields and Historic Sites The War of 1812: A Guide to Battlefields and Historic Sites
The War of 1812: A Guide to Battlefields and Historic Sites The War of 1812: A Guide to Battlefields and Historic Sites
The War of 1812: A Guide to Battlefields and Historic Sites The War of 1812: A Guide to Battlefields and Historic Sites
The War of 1812: A Guide to Battlefields and Historic Sites

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