My Little Red Book


Free download. Book file PDF easily for everyone and every device. You can download and read online My Little Red Book file PDF Book only if you are registered here. And also you can download or read online all Book PDF file that related with My Little Red Book book. Happy reading My Little Red Book Bookeveryone. Download file Free Book PDF My Little Red Book at Complete PDF Library. This Book have some digital formats such us :paperbook, ebook, kindle, epub, fb2 and another formats. Here is The CompletePDF Book Library. It's free to register here to get Book file PDF My Little Red Book Pocket Guide.
Audio Preview

It was very entertaining, but some of the stories were a little much and she chose all feminists as contributors, so hearing everything from that perspective got a little old. I wish I could make a copy for my daughter including only the stories that would be appropriate for her. I did learn a lot about how I want to go through this transition with my daughter and what she will want and need to hear.

My favorite quote is: "This means that your body is gett I liked the concept of this book a lot. My favorite quote is: "This means that your body is getting ready to be a woman, no that you are a woman. When you become a woman is up to you. For now, you can be a happy sixth-grade girl and still love sports and have boys who are friends and wear your ratty jeans and your Toledo Mud Hens T-shirt.

Aug 01, Erin Reilly-Sanders rated it it was amazing Shelves: teen , non-fiction. What I liked so much about this book was not the book itself, but what the book does. The book is nice in general- attractive binding,k a good variety of short stories, information about each author, often with humourous quips, and even the year at the beginning of each story so that the reader can begin to place them within a chronology.

The editing seemed well done, with several little editor's notes at the ends of various stories that briefly added to the whole without getting in the way. But What I liked so much about this book was not the book itself, but what the book does. But all of that is besides the big point. What the book did, at least to me, is make me want to talk about it. It, as in the book, the women in the book, the girls, now women that I've known, my period, my mom's period.

And I think this is a great book to talk about. I don't think that there is anyone out there who My Little Red Book is not appropriate for- prepubescent girls, women, girls getting their period, mothers, dad, boys, grandparents. While dealing with similar issues as Eve Ensler's Vagina Monologues, this book is more gentle, less controversial, and less confrontational- Just a simple presentation of true stories that describe a variety of experiences. What one takes away from the book is not determined by the authors, or even the editor. Instead, it makes you think and ask yourself how you feel about the issues the women and girls in the book come across.

But all the same, this book deals with the shame that is experienced by many women with all kinds of sexual issues, not the least of which is menstruation. Ever since a little girl at church told me that "down there" was "dirty," I've been thinking about what our society can do to help. I think this book is a good step toward positive acknowledgment of all the bits of being female. While it's still not easy for me, I've been trying to let this book help me, particularly as a vehicle for conversation, feel more comfortable talking with others about menstruation and other issues.

My aspiration is to menstruate shamelessly. Jan 26, Bobbie Crawford rated it it was amazing Recommends it for: Women of all ages and open-minded men.

See a Problem?

Shelves: books-that-i-own , all-reviews , non-fiction-reviews. When I heard about this book I was instantly intrigued. The differences in cultural beliefs and how the first periods were treated along with how the women were treated; reading about Feb 19, Timmy Cham rated it it was amazing. I admire the premise of this book: So often, young girls feel "weird" or "strange" because of events involving their bodies.

The way to mollify their fears, as this book makes plain, is to point out that every young girl feels exactly the same fears, insecurities, etc. Back in the '60s, we called this exercise--of bringing to light the heretofore hidden feelings that every woman has--"consciousness raising. So, OK, since I'm a guy, I've obviously I admire the premise of this book: So often, young girls feel "weird" or "strange" because of events involving their bodies.

So, OK, since I'm a guy, I've obviously never had a period.


  1. My Little Red Book;
  2. There Will Be Blood.
  3. Preserves: A beginner’s guide to making jams and jellies, chutneys and pickles, sauces and ketchups, syrups and alcoholic sips;
  4. FEARLESS (Italian Edition)?
  5. Cap Anson: The Grand Old Man of Baseball!
  6. Saturday Millionaires: How Winning Football Builds Winning Colleges.

But since I'm fascinated by all things feminine, I've always listened intently when women have told me of the nuanced circumstances of their menarches: One woman endured years of painful self-consciousness on account of getting her first period at only nine years old. Another woman, of Catholic Mexican descent, burst into fearful tears--since she'd never been told about menstruation, and thought the blood meant something was dreadfully wrong.

So in reading this unique and often poignant book of first-person menarche-memoirs, I kept an eye out for the nuances. Where and what age did it take place? Who did she tell first? How did that person react? How did the girl feel? Did she receive outdated advice? It's Me, Margaret , was published in Girls' feelings ranged the gamut, as this anthology attests: Some felt fear ; some felt joy ; some felt overwhelmed ; some felt irritated ; some felt exposed ; some felt relief ; some felt ecstatic ; some felt annoyed ; some felt horrified ; some felt embarrassed ; some felt disappointment.

Et cetera. In short, there's no "normal" way to feel about getting one's period. It's almost an intriguing kind of Rorschach test, according to YA author Michele Jaffe: "I discovered that how you react to Your First Period lets you see the beginnings of personality traits that are magnified as an adult" page 25 The book contains a variety of experiences from different eras: Menarche during slavery page 41 ; the fear of "menotoxins" in the s page 21 ; a Depression-era orphanage pp.

Thanksgiving cranberry sauce page ; snorkeling in the Caribbean p. But while many girls are today given "The Period Talk" in gym class, this book reveals that so many questions often remain: Does a period happen only once? Does it only happen at certain hours of the day? How does one pronounce that tongue-twisting word "menstruation"? How can blood come out if you're a virgin--wouldn't the hymen keep it in?

Should you put off using tampons until after marriage because of the "virgin thing"? How much blood comes out during a first period? Why is the stain rust colored--all the pictures in books show red stains! Where's the belt--Judy Blume's book from talks about a belt! Won't everyone notice this BIG pad--I can feel it! Won't this small tampon get lost inside me--I can't feel it! How do you dispense of used sanitary products? What if I go swimming and the tampon "floats out"? Will my dad still want me to mow the lawn?

And along the way, women share the life lessons and morals they learned from menstruation: "What getting periods teaches you," writes Bita Moghaddam, "is that life will not be fair [ Boys don't have to deal with this! But you can handle it as long as you know what to wear" page Kate Zieman "thinks that first periods would be easier if we viewed them as one of the many steps toward adulthood instead of as automatic womanhood" page And aren't the emotional markers far more important than the physiological ones?

Even Britney Spears seems to have noticed this! It made me sad to see the word "embarrassed" occur in so many of these accounts Google Books counts 23 occurrences of the word. I couldn't help but notice how much the issues surrounding menarche dovetail with the constellation of similar issues surrounding female, but not male virginity--compare, especially, Jessica Valenti's masterful work The Purity Myth. Because this view is so pervasive, it is easy to forget that it is not the only one possible. Apr 02, Cecilia rated it it was amazing Shelves: red-covers.

The contributors ranged from young to old, mothers to daughters to sisters. I especially appreciated those who had a terrible or disappointing "first period" experience with their parents and vowed to change that with their own daughters.

My Little Red Book

I really enjoyed the older stories where "belted" pads were still in vogue - I had never heard of those before and sadly, I have not read Are You There God? It's Me, Margaret. Or that French women cannot make good mayonnaise while they have their periods. I r The contributors ranged from young to old, mothers to daughters to sisters. I really loved Gloria Steinem's essay "If Men Could Menstruate" - the updated version in my little red book truly kicked ass!

And I swear this entire book was chock full of really awesome quotables : Complete review on my blog Dec 22, Rosie rated it liked it Shelves: ya-lit. In this collection of stories, women of various ages and cultures share the story of their first period. Some are humorous while others focus more on the emotions and thoughts experienced by this event. I found it interesting to see how different cultures and eras treated this subject. Even still, it's still, at times, considered a taboo subject. I would recommend this for young girls I wish it was around when I was twelve or any woman.

The only way to talk about health, even the taboo aspects In this collection of stories, women of various ages and cultures share the story of their first period. The only way to talk about health, even the taboo aspects of it, is to start a conversation about it and I think this type of book does just that. Dec 16, Lewis Albert Stephen blower rated it it was amazing. This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers.

To view it, click here. I like this book because it helps me understand things that I don't know any more but sometimes i. Jun 22, Laura Cobrinik rated it it was amazing. I read Rachel Kauder Nalebuff's book as an older adult. It basically is a collection of short stories by various authors on their memories of when they first started to menstruate. A good book to give a girl as she starts her journey as a woman.

Jun 15, Meridith Aronsky rated it liked it. I only read Meg Cabot's story:. Aug 29, Kate rated it it was ok. Many stories repeated the same thing. May 03, Esmy rated it liked it. A cute little book :. Aug 09, Liz rated it really liked it. To be honest, I had no idea what this was about and I picked it for the cover. It seems like a good book to get a young teen.

Mar 13, Arminzerella rated it liked it Shelves: borrowed-from-the-library , nonfiction , young-adult-nonfiction , womens-health , women , collection , menstruation. Rachel Kauder Nalebuff became interested in stories about first menstruation experiences after getting her period for the first time — after which women in her family shared their stories with her. She was really fascinated by their tales, and felt that telling these stories was a great way to open up the topic of menstruation.

She compiled this collection to share with girls and women of all ages. Maybe that commonality of experience will be the bridge that makes it easier and normal to talk about periods. While not all of the stories will move everyone to tears or laughter or horror, there are many that do just that. The whole thing — cardboard applicator and all.

I was in seventh grade, age thirteen, and we were watching a movie on Chinese history…I was very excited, lying there on the carpet, at the notion that now it might be my turn. I ended up sticking it out for the whole film, which I still feel is quite an accomplishment — it was a long movie; there is a lot that happened in fourteenth-century China. My eyes grew wide as I watched the hot dog dangle from its small string while my mother wrapped it in a tissue and placed it on the counter.

Did she always store one in there? Was she able to store more than one? Why did she take it out? What would she do with it now? Did other women keep hot dogs in their vaginas? Why did this hot dog have a string? Feb 23, Cortney Cassidy rated it liked it. Apr 09, Marie rated it really liked it.

My Little Red Book is a wonderful collection of stories about women's first periods. The stories come from women from different walks of life, different age groups and different cultures. Because of this, each story was unique, yet equally fascinating. This book is awesome.

While I was reading this book I kept thinking "Where has this book been all my life? Why didn't someone think of this before? I hate that word My Little Red Book is a wonderful collection of stories about women's first periods. I hate that word , I would have told them they were crazy. I not only read this book, I thoroughly enjoyed it. The collection reminds us that even though we are in many ways different from each other, there's a common bond with share with all women.

That bond should be celebrated and talked about rather than hidden and silenced. Also, I especially loved the section on "Euphemisms and Code Words" for periods. Some of them made me cringe a little "Arts and Crafts week at panty camp", "Ordering l'omelette rouge" and lots of them made me laugh out loud "Having the painters in", "Cleanup in aisle one", "Closed for maintenance".


  • Poetry of the Buddha: Verses 1-40 from the Udana [Translated].
  • Machiavelli: The Prince (Cambridge Texts in the History of Political Thought).
  • What Your Doctor May Not Tell You about Heart Disease.
  • Its Autumn (The Adventures of Riley and Tiny Book 1)?
  • Cinnamon;
  • Site Search Navigation.
  • Jesus Lives In Your Hometown (Will You Be A Horse For God Book 1).
  • It's Me Margaret in their stories. I wonder if anyone realized at the time of its original publication just how many women or generations would be affected by the book. It also appeared in the Beverly Hills episode "Alone at the Top" in From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Garage rock [1] proto-punk [3]. Retrieved 16 June Retrieved 28 July Icons of Rock. The Great Rock Discography 7th ed. Edinburgh: Canongate Books. Beverly Hills Retrieved 12 December This is a dynamite book, not just for girls just learning about menstruation, but for women looking to see what kinds of experience other women had when they encountered this particular step toward adulthood.

    It's also a good book for those who want to see a new face of a favorite author: Rachel got writers like Erica Jong, Gloria Steinem, Cecily von Zeigesar, Meg Cabot, and, um, me to contribute. There are stories from all over the world and over the last seventy years, showing how times and at This is a dynamite book, not just for girls just learning about menstruation, but for women looking to see what kinds of experience other women had when they encountered this particular step toward adulthood. There are stories from all over the world and over the last seventy years, showing how times and attitudes change.

    Rachel worked to bring this project to completion for years, and I was so thrilled when the book finally came out. Give it to a friend for her birthdays, bridal, or baby shower. Give it to a mom who helped you through those first strange days, or the girlfriend who gave you a better way to look at it. Give it to a guy who's just moved in with his first girlfriend, or a young father with his first daughter. Take the last shame off our periods! Aug 10, Nancy rated it liked it Shelves: young-adult-interest , women-s-interest , feminist-interest , august , children-s-interest.

    Nalebuff began collecting stories from women about their first menstrual periods as a high school project. She found that while women had a variety of stories to tell, several themes, taboos, or old wives tales, carried across cultures. The stories collected here are from young women who have just recently started their periods to elderly women long over with menopause. A large number of women mentioned getting their initial, or only information about menstruation from Judy Blume's children's bo Nalebuff began collecting stories from women about their first menstrual periods as a high school project.

    A large number of women mentioned getting their initial, or only information about menstruation from Judy Blume's children's book, "Are You There, God? It's Me, Margaret," originally published in Nalebuff brings to our attention that young women in many countries in Africa miss weeks and weeks of school because they have no sanitary supplies, or because there are no private toilets at school. The royalties from this book are going to support the School Water and Sanitation Project of the Health and Water Foundation in Kenya which will supply private and sanitary supplies, and to Seva Mandir, a health education program in India.

    Nalebuff provides information about similar programs, as well as a variety of resources, including a website where girls can track their periods, ask questions, and share stories www. This book is recommended to women and girls of all ages, and would make a nice book for mothers to share with daughters as they give "The Talk.

    Keep the conversation going!

    View 1 comment. Feb 19, Venessa rated it it was amazing. This book got me thinking about how strange it is that every woman will menstruate and yet it is still such a taboo to talk about. The purpose of the book is to obliterate taboos and make every girl realize that this is nothing to be ashamed of, and indeed, should even be appreciated and celebrated. I can't wait until every young girl I know reaches the age when I can buy this book for her and become a part of their growing up and into life. Nalebuff gathers stories from famous and not famous wom This book got me thinking about how strange it is that every woman will menstruate and yet it is still such a taboo to talk about.

    Nalebuff gathers stories from famous and not famous women together in this volume sharing their first period experiences. Some are laugh out loud funny; others terrifying. All are valuable. Also valuable: royalties from the sale of the book go to helping women in other countries, like Kenya, acquire supplies so they can continue their education in Kenya, poor families who can't afford supplies for their menstruating daughters cannot go to school, stunting their education month after month. It also got me thinking about my own first period So I guess it was uneventful for me.

    Then again, my mom rocked and I knew all about that kind of stuff before I needed to, so it may be good that it was uneventful, I just incorporated into my life as what it is: an unavoidable event in the life of a woman. Apr 08, Lisa rated it liked it Shelves: book-club , young-adult.

    I liked the concept of this book a lot. It was very entertaining, but some of the stories were a little much and she chose all feminists as contributors, so hearing everything from that perspective got a little old. I wish I could make a copy for my daughter including only the stories that would be appropriate for her. I did learn a lot about how I want to go through this transition with my daughter and what she will want and need to hear. My favorite quote is: "This means that your body is gett I liked the concept of this book a lot.

    My favorite quote is: "This means that your body is getting ready to be a woman, no that you are a woman. When you become a woman is up to you. For now, you can be a happy sixth-grade girl and still love sports and have boys who are friends and wear your ratty jeans and your Toledo Mud Hens T-shirt. Aug 01, Erin Reilly-Sanders rated it it was amazing Shelves: teen , non-fiction. What I liked so much about this book was not the book itself, but what the book does.

    The book is nice in general- attractive binding,k a good variety of short stories, information about each author, often with humourous quips, and even the year at the beginning of each story so that the reader can begin to place them within a chronology. The editing seemed well done, with several little editor's notes at the ends of various stories that briefly added to the whole without getting in the way. But What I liked so much about this book was not the book itself, but what the book does. But all of that is besides the big point.

    What the book did, at least to me, is make me want to talk about it. It, as in the book, the women in the book, the girls, now women that I've known, my period, my mom's period. And I think this is a great book to talk about. I don't think that there is anyone out there who My Little Red Book is not appropriate for- prepubescent girls, women, girls getting their period, mothers, dad, boys, grandparents. While dealing with similar issues as Eve Ensler's Vagina Monologues, this book is more gentle, less controversial, and less confrontational- Just a simple presentation of true stories that describe a variety of experiences.

    What one takes away from the book is not determined by the authors, or even the editor. Instead, it makes you think and ask yourself how you feel about the issues the women and girls in the book come across. But all the same, this book deals with the shame that is experienced by many women with all kinds of sexual issues, not the least of which is menstruation. Ever since a little girl at church told me that "down there" was "dirty," I've been thinking about what our society can do to help.

    I think this book is a good step toward positive acknowledgment of all the bits of being female. While it's still not easy for me, I've been trying to let this book help me, particularly as a vehicle for conversation, feel more comfortable talking with others about menstruation and other issues. My aspiration is to menstruate shamelessly. Jan 26, Bobbie Crawford rated it it was amazing Recommends it for: Women of all ages and open-minded men. Shelves: books-that-i-own , all-reviews , non-fiction-reviews. When I heard about this book I was instantly intrigued.

    The differences in cultural beliefs and how the first periods were treated along with how the women were treated; reading about Feb 19, Timmy Cham rated it it was amazing. I admire the premise of this book: So often, young girls feel "weird" or "strange" because of events involving their bodies. The way to mollify their fears, as this book makes plain, is to point out that every young girl feels exactly the same fears, insecurities, etc. Back in the '60s, we called this exercise--of bringing to light the heretofore hidden feelings that every woman has--"consciousness raising.

    So, OK, since I'm a guy, I've obviously I admire the premise of this book: So often, young girls feel "weird" or "strange" because of events involving their bodies. So, OK, since I'm a guy, I've obviously never had a period. But since I'm fascinated by all things feminine, I've always listened intently when women have told me of the nuanced circumstances of their menarches: One woman endured years of painful self-consciousness on account of getting her first period at only nine years old.

    Another woman, of Catholic Mexican descent, burst into fearful tears--since she'd never been told about menstruation, and thought the blood meant something was dreadfully wrong. So in reading this unique and often poignant book of first-person menarche-memoirs, I kept an eye out for the nuances. Where and what age did it take place?

    In My Little Red Book

    Who did she tell first? How did that person react? How did the girl feel? Did she receive outdated advice? It's Me, Margaret , was published in Girls' feelings ranged the gamut, as this anthology attests: Some felt fear ; some felt joy ; some felt overwhelmed ; some felt irritated ; some felt exposed ; some felt relief ; some felt ecstatic ; some felt annoyed ; some felt horrified ; some felt embarrassed ; some felt disappointment.

    Et cetera. In short, there's no "normal" way to feel about getting one's period. It's almost an intriguing kind of Rorschach test, according to YA author Michele Jaffe: "I discovered that how you react to Your First Period lets you see the beginnings of personality traits that are magnified as an adult" page 25 The book contains a variety of experiences from different eras: Menarche during slavery page 41 ; the fear of "menotoxins" in the s page 21 ; a Depression-era orphanage pp.

    Thanksgiving cranberry sauce page ; snorkeling in the Caribbean p. But while many girls are today given "The Period Talk" in gym class, this book reveals that so many questions often remain: Does a period happen only once? Does it only happen at certain hours of the day? How does one pronounce that tongue-twisting word "menstruation"?

    How can blood come out if you're a virgin--wouldn't the hymen keep it in? Should you put off using tampons until after marriage because of the "virgin thing"? How much blood comes out during a first period? Why is the stain rust colored--all the pictures in books show red stains! Where's the belt--Judy Blume's book from talks about a belt! Won't everyone notice this BIG pad--I can feel it! Won't this small tampon get lost inside me--I can't feel it!

    How do you dispense of used sanitary products? What if I go swimming and the tampon "floats out"? Will my dad still want me to mow the lawn? And along the way, women share the life lessons and morals they learned from menstruation: "What getting periods teaches you," writes Bita Moghaddam, "is that life will not be fair [ Boys don't have to deal with this!

    My Little Red Book - Manfred Mann (Film Version)

    But you can handle it as long as you know what to wear" page Kate Zieman "thinks that first periods would be easier if we viewed them as one of the many steps toward adulthood instead of as automatic womanhood" page And aren't the emotional markers far more important than the physiological ones? Even Britney Spears seems to have noticed this! It made me sad to see the word "embarrassed" occur in so many of these accounts Google Books counts 23 occurrences of the word. I couldn't help but notice how much the issues surrounding menarche dovetail with the constellation of similar issues surrounding female, but not male virginity--compare, especially, Jessica Valenti's masterful work The Purity Myth.

    Because this view is so pervasive, it is easy to forget that it is not the only one possible. Apr 02, Cecilia rated it it was amazing Shelves: red-covers. The contributors ranged from young to old, mothers to daughters to sisters. I especially appreciated those who had a terrible or disappointing "first period" experience with their parents and vowed to change that with their own daughters. I really enjoyed the older stories where "belted" pads were still in vogue - I had never heard of those before and sadly, I have not read Are You There God?

    It's Me, Margaret. Or that French women cannot make good mayonnaise while they have their periods. I r The contributors ranged from young to old, mothers to daughters to sisters. I really loved Gloria Steinem's essay "If Men Could Menstruate" - the updated version in my little red book truly kicked ass! And I swear this entire book was chock full of really awesome quotables : Complete review on my blog Dec 22, Rosie rated it liked it Shelves: ya-lit. In this collection of stories, women of various ages and cultures share the story of their first period.

    Some are humorous while others focus more on the emotions and thoughts experienced by this event. I found it interesting to see how different cultures and eras treated this subject. Even still, it's still, at times, considered a taboo subject. I would recommend this for young girls I wish it was around when I was twelve or any woman.

    Love - My Little Red Book / Hey Joe | Releases | Discogs

    The only way to talk about health, even the taboo aspects In this collection of stories, women of various ages and cultures share the story of their first period. The only way to talk about health, even the taboo aspects of it, is to start a conversation about it and I think this type of book does just that. Dec 16, Lewis Albert Stephen blower rated it it was amazing. This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I like this book because it helps me understand things that I don't know any more but sometimes i. Jun 22, Laura Cobrinik rated it it was amazing.

    I read Rachel Kauder Nalebuff's book as an older adult. It basically is a collection of short stories by various authors on their memories of when they first started to menstruate. A good book to give a girl as she starts her journey as a woman. Jun 15, Meridith Aronsky rated it liked it. I only read Meg Cabot's story:. Aug 29, Kate rated it it was ok. Many stories repeated the same thing.

    Site Navigation

    May 03, Esmy rated it liked it. A cute little book :. Aug 09, Liz rated it really liked it.

    My Little Red Book My Little Red Book
    My Little Red Book My Little Red Book
    My Little Red Book My Little Red Book
    My Little Red Book My Little Red Book
    My Little Red Book My Little Red Book
    My Little Red Book My Little Red Book

Related My Little Red Book



Copyright 2019 - All Right Reserved