Literary Bric-à-Brac and the Victorians: From Commodities to Oddities (The Nineteenth Century Series)


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Wooden, Warren W. Watson, Jeanie. Lexington: The University Press of Kentucky, Google Books. Caboni, Alessandro. Edward Lear e la tradizione del Nonsense inglese. Roma: Bulzoni, Tigges, Wim. An Anatomy of Literary Nonsense. Costerus, New Series, Amsterdam: Rodopi, Nonsense Literature for Children. Aesop to Seuss. Hamden, Conn. Palumbo, Angelica. Genova: E. Lecercle, Jean-Jacques. Philosophy of Nonsense. The Intuitions of Victorian Nonsense Literature.

London and New York: Routledge, Parsons, Marnie. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, Weiss Adamson, Melitta.

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New York and London: Garland, Pleij, Herman. Dreaming of Cockaygne. Medieval Fantasies of the Perfect Life. Uitgeverij Prometheus, ]. Webb, Diane. New York: Columbia University Press, Reichertz, Ronald. The Making of the Alice Books. Stemmler, Theo, and Stefan Horlacher, eds. Sinn im Unsinn.

Esser-Hall, Gabriele. Hildesheim: Georg Olms Verlag, Presberg, Charles D.

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Menninghaus, Winfried. In Praise of Nonsense. Kant and Bluebeard. Kant, Tieck und Blaubart. Berlin: Suhrkamp Verlag, ]. Pickford, Henry. Stanford, Ca: Stanford University Press, Sala, Michele. Wullschlager, Jackie. Hans Christian Andersen. The Life of a Storyteller. Olson, Kirby. Comedy after Postmodernism. Lubbock, Tx. Saukkola, Mirva. McGillis, Roderick.

Oxford: Blackwell, Heyman, Michael. Westport CT and London: Praeger, Crimi, Giuseppe.

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Tradizione e fortuna del Burchiello. Manziana: Vecchiarelli, Uhl, Patrice. My current research projects emerge from an interest in textile cultures in Victorian and Edwardian Britain, particularly the ways in which novelists represented the role of cloth in social life.

Wells and Arnold Bennett. My research on Victorian material culture also informs my teaching, as I encourage students to explore the key roles played by objects in nineteenth-century literature and culture. Among the modules I have taught are:.


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I currently supervise a number of PhD students and have supervised five to successful completion. I have also examined twelve PhD theses, six of them externally.

Literary Bric-a-Brac and the Victorians: From Commodities to Oddities

My graduate students work in the fields of Victorian and twentieth-century literature and culture. On their own, these objects might seem rather innocuous, but each object has a buried past that Goldhill digs up and restores for our consideration. Discovered in the late eighteenth century in Dorset, the Roman mosaic had Christian symbols embedded in its design, instigating a debate that Christianity began in England rather than Rome.

The Cambridge Camden Society, formed in , installed a stone altar in the Cambridge Round Church during their restoration, of the church to its medieval glory. Mid-nineteenth-century Christians, however, viewed the installation of a medieval stone altar as a move backward to pre-Reformation papacy, and the vicar took the case to the ecclesiastical courts, ultimately winning in his efforts to have the stone altar removed.

Lastly, the Bodley chasuble depicts Biblical imagery in a woven tapestry designed in the sumptuous style of William Morris — This collection of objects, the garment, altar, and mosaic, raises concerns about the difficult relationship between religion and materiality, or between the material and the immaterial. Goldhill continues with the exploration of religion and material culture in chapters three and four with new focus on Victorian reconstructions of foreign pasts in foreign lands.

The dialectic Goldhill identifies between Victorian concepts of reconstruction and restoration is compelling, offering an unexplored anxiety that permeates not only the whole work but also much of the current research in material culture studies. Restoration projects an idealized past, whereas reconstruction manifests the past through contemporary things. The Buried Life of Things narrates Victorian progress through objects, from its pre-Christian origins through the mid-nineteenth century religious crisis and ending with the Victorian imperialist ambitions.

The Buried Life of Things will surprise readers interested in art, history, architecture, material culture, and literature with its elucidations of the complex lives of Victorian objects. The third book of The Forsyte Saga —21 opens with Soames Forsyte roaming the family house on the Bayswater Road and recalling his own childhood visits. Chapter 1 sweeps the reader from late antiquity to the mid-Victorian period. The chief power of the religious relic in medieval and early modern times was their perceived ability to reconstitute the departed saint and to physically hold them to a particular place.

The English Reformation transformed many religious reliquaries from flesh and blood into dust and ash primarily by removing them from their place-specific context. But Lutz shows that relic culture did not dry up; it was simply rerouted. While royalty provided a transition between saint and celebrity, it was literary men and, to a much lesser extent, women who became the most prominent secular saints p.

Lutz shows how the poetry of the Romantics, particularly that of John Keats — , became relics in their own right. One particular body of readers provided a very vital transfusion to Keats. Chapter 2 considers the power of secondary relics. Lutz argues that it is the death of a person that paradoxically breathes life into their everyday objects p. The value of the object is then proportionate to the regard felt by those still living.

Focusing on Charles Dickens —70 , Lutz presents masks in their many guises. Her tour takes us from the condemned at Newgate to the deathbed vigils of the great and the good. The expansion of shrine culture, along with its associated pilgrimages from the religious to the secular, began in post-Reformation England and reached its apogee in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. The sites as well as the subjects of shrines expanded to homes and woodland paths. Finally, shrines proliferated through souvenir taking.

The desire for portable shrines is, Lutz argues, part of the appeal of the pocket-sized elegy p. The portability, not to mention workability, of hair made it the top choice for wearable relics. In Chapter 5, Lutz focuses on hair jewelry and its potential to become mourning jewelry regardless of whether the clipping was originally taken from a living or dead subject p.

Hair jewelry was the apogee for Victorian relic culture —but also the beginning of the end. The carefully guarded relics of Victorian writers are a chief fascination of this study, but their exemption from the ravages of modernism raises questions about the historical value of celebrity relics. The issue of celebrity is crucial to a second key question: what is the relationship between relics and souvenirs?

It would be fascinating to hear more about the manufacture and consumption of mourning materials and how, by this account, they appear to blur boundaries of class and gender. The makers of Victorian relics ranged from the gentlemanly scientist or artist taking plaster casts, to the artisan reproducing original relics by the thousands, to the legions of women of all classes whose home handicraft was essential for preserving relic authenticity.

Follow the middle-class album to the second-hand market; trace the unidentified, un-sexed locks of hair. Personal identity and identification remain so essential to Victorian relics. Ibid, This publication is another welcome addition to the growing literature on the social archaeology of Africa, a theoretically-informed perspective that has in the last few decades displaced the cultural history concerns that had previously dominated archaeological scholarship in the region.

The volume consists of eight original essays, including studies by each of the co-editors, plus an introductory chapter by the editors and a summary by Stephen Shennan, along with a foreword by Christopher DeCorse, whose comments nicely situate the volume in the history of regional archaeology. Yet problems with assumptions of ethnic continuity and the varied material expressions of identity lead some researchers to shy away from the topic.

Ethnicity is seen as relevant and real by all of these scholars, and it is recognized as historically constructed, consisting of inwardly focused feelings of connection to the past that can take material form in various ways, and can be, but is not always, consciously articulated. That the chapter authors variously privilege differing aspects of ethnicity is seen as a strength rather than a weakness, with ambiguity used as a focus through which to understand how such identities are construed over time and space.

Nonetheless, all the authors recognize the importance of distinguishing the different processes of identification entailed in ethnic identities, all recognize that such identities are fluid over time, all recognize a central connection between ethnicity and materiality, and all recognize that examinations of ethnicity take place in a broader political context with categories of identity not exclusively fashioned within groups, but constrained, molded, and sometimes created by others: neighboring groups, regional polities and movements, Colonial powers, and global conditions.

They span through time, as well, from prehistory to the Colonial era. Cameron Gokee focuses on pottery-making techniques, especially the gestures used in vessel rim formation, in Senegambia from the early eighteenth century through to the mid-twentieth century. Co-editor Kevin C.


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Importantly, he reveals that culturally transmitted traditions have time depth than can be measured, and that even when ethnic ascriptions and political entities have the same names at different times, they do not necessarily have the same content or meaning. He found long-term continuity in certain ethnolinguistic groups, such as the Yoruba and Edo.

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Pierre de Maret and Alexandre Livingstone Smith inquire into identity of the Luba, tracing distinct pottery traditions and ceremonial and ritually symbolic material culture back over a thousand years. John Giblin considers the political implications of precolonial Twa, Tutsi, and Hutu identities in Rwanda. He examines the ways that these categories have come to be constructed over time and applies the results of faunal analysis to deconstruct them. Paul J. Lane then provides a ceramic-based overview of identity in East African archaeology.

He supports the fluid nature of identity in his consideration of the Bondel of northeast Tanzania, for whom that identity seems to have been important in the early nineteenth century but became less so as clan affiliations became more significant in the face of slave raiding and migration, only to have Bondel identity reemerge later under the influence of missionaries. In the closing paper, Stephen Shennan offers a cultural evolutionary perspective on the preceding papers that to this reviewer reads like the old cultural history approach with a rather Whiggish set of new clothes.

Further, he asserts that a cultural evolutionary perspective is concerned with the transmission of culture through time in which change can be seen to act. That said, his concluding points are markedly on-point:. John P. The earliest chapters of the book attempt to define, categorise, and critique the genre. Difference — as it relates to gender, class, and sexuality — is another key theme of the volume.

As such, it offers a potent vehicle for representing other unstable concepts, be it gender, race, or class; divisions between subject and object; or even language itself.

Nineteenth-Century Transatlantic Reprinting and the Embodied Book remarkably contributes to our understanding of material culture and the book as a cultural object, particularly of note in our contemporary age where literary communities continue to divine the significance of print in an age of multimedia, multimodality, and multiple editions.

DeSpain examines a gamut of literary works, from American poetry to British essays, and her focus on the book as material object allows for her close, intimate criticism of international readerships and textual cultures alike. I link these two chapters of her study because of their marked interested in the more aesthetic concerns of the publishing industry: how the book looks and the spirit of the book through its printing. For Whitman, who saw printing much like democracy — the binding agent of the nation — reprinting ultimately began to lead to a poorer quality of texts as well as reinforcing a stodgy British literature.

DeSpain concludes her study with a contextualized reading of the Chace Act and the emergence of the Arts and Crafts movement — two key historical moments in the late-nineteenth century in regards to the publishing and creative industries. His study joins a growing number of recent books in the history of science that examine the creation and support of epistemic and professional scientific networks in the British Atlantic world.

Yet, while they supported global efforts to observe the transit, as a corporation the HBC sought first and foremost to make a profit and therefore maintained a complicated relationship with scientists and learned societies. Increasingly, however, as the validity of the chartered monopoly of the company came into question, the HBC moved to sponsor and publicize its support of scientific endeavors, including British, American, and French projects, in order to cultivate a reputation as a benefactor to science invested in the public interest and as an integral facet of British scientific and territorial hegemony.

Reliant on its chartered monopoly status for its success in the fur trading business, the HBC as a corporation negotiated its position as one based on power, secrecy, and, later, benevolence. In part one, these include HBC ship captains, such as the amateur ornithologist Alexander Light, and HBC surveyors, such as Peter Fidler — , who made significant contributions to mapping the interior of North America. As the professionalization of science developed during the Enlightenment era, alliances were forged between learned scientific societies and educated HBC officers.

By this period in the mid-nineteenth century, the HBC increasingly sought public praise of its sponsorship of scientific endeavors as one armament in a public relations campaign waged to combat vocal challenges to its monopoly. It wanted to establish itself as an important operator in British North America, contributing to the betterment of British citizens by facilitating important expeditions, studies, and collections.

Therefore literary tributes and other visual means of acknowledgement, including the sponsorship of artistic endeavors, maps that revealed the cartographic exploits of the HBC, and specimen collecting, proved valuable in cultivating a vision of the HBC as benevolent, while also supporting its economic interests. He goes on to state, however, that firmly documenting their contributions is impossible due to a disappointing lack of evidence. Throughout, Binnema raises interesting questions about British North American relations with America when it came to mercantile interests and scientific exploration.

Nationalist factions discouraged the cultivation of cross-interests, especially during periods of war, international tension, and strained diplomatic relations. Astonishingly, between and during the Civil War period , the HBC submitted over 12, items to the Smithsonian, including specimens, journals, and artifacts, mostly through the exertions of Spencer Fullerton Baird —87 and Joseph Henry — That this burst in collaboration coincides with the rise of global scientific professionalization and disciplinary specialization seems evident.

However, Binnema also conjectures that as vocal annexationists sought HBC territories, public accolades for the HBC and an influential institution in its favor in Washington, D.

Literary Bric-à-Brac and the Victorians: From Commodities to Oddities (The Nineteenth Century Series) Literary Bric-à-Brac and the Victorians: From Commodities to Oddities (The Nineteenth Century Series)
Literary Bric-à-Brac and the Victorians: From Commodities to Oddities (The Nineteenth Century Series) Literary Bric-à-Brac and the Victorians: From Commodities to Oddities (The Nineteenth Century Series)
Literary Bric-à-Brac and the Victorians: From Commodities to Oddities (The Nineteenth Century Series) Literary Bric-à-Brac and the Victorians: From Commodities to Oddities (The Nineteenth Century Series)
Literary Bric-à-Brac and the Victorians: From Commodities to Oddities (The Nineteenth Century Series) Literary Bric-à-Brac and the Victorians: From Commodities to Oddities (The Nineteenth Century Series)
Literary Bric-à-Brac and the Victorians: From Commodities to Oddities (The Nineteenth Century Series) Literary Bric-à-Brac and the Victorians: From Commodities to Oddities (The Nineteenth Century Series)
Literary Bric-à-Brac and the Victorians: From Commodities to Oddities (The Nineteenth Century Series) Literary Bric-à-Brac and the Victorians: From Commodities to Oddities (The Nineteenth Century Series)
Literary Bric-à-Brac and the Victorians: From Commodities to Oddities (The Nineteenth Century Series) Literary Bric-à-Brac and the Victorians: From Commodities to Oddities (The Nineteenth Century Series)

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