Introducing the Positions for Cello: Volume 2 - Second, 2-1/2, Third, 3-1/2


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Composed by Harvey S. Whistler and Herman Hummel. Orchestra, Violin First Position. Viola, Violin A Transitional Method. Cello, Orchestra Volume 1 - Fourth Position. Published by Hal Leonard HL. Orchestra, Violin Volume 2. Cello, Orchestra Composed by Harvey S. Rubank Solo Collection. Concert, Contest. Cello, Orchestra First Position.

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By signing up you consent with the terms in our Privacy Policy. I am a music teacher. Search all Harvey S. Some Relationships between the Fourth and "Octave" Positions. Most methods give slight importance to the fundamentals and often jump the student to the fourth position with hardly any preparatory material. In spite of this, the popularity of the cello has grown steadily. A year or so ago someone brought me a book of etudes and scales by Rudolf Matz. After looking it over carefully, I became more and more in- terested both in what this wonderful man had to say and in what his meth- od meant for a new generation of cello students.

I asked questions about the origin of the man and his whereabouts for I felt I must see him, talk with him, and examine the additional thirty-one volumes listed on the back page of che book I had. It did not take me long to fly there - we met and became the best of friends. Professor Mate's lovely personality, his dedication to music and to his instrument, and his kindness and simplicity made me realize that here was not only a wonderful musician and pedagogue but a great human being as well.

We talked for days about cello methods and the present-day prob- lems of technique, and we exchanged thoughts and ideas enough to fill an- other thirty-two volumes! And now when teachers gather to discuss the problems of teaching material, the answer can be in the affirmative: something new has been published!

I dedicate this condensation to my beloved teacher and friend, Gregor Piatigorsky, to whom I am eternally indebted for his influence and for the guidance and inspiration which he has given me over many years.

Lev Aronson viii PREFACE There has long been a need for a study of cello technique that is both comprehensive and detailed- Professor Matz y in his thirty- two- volume original, has covered every aspect of the fundamentals of cello technique. The chapters for beginners, the etudes based on those chapters , the ex- planation of the sixteen basic finger-changing patterns, the preparatory exercises for scales, the scales themselves, the thumb position, the right- hand exercises - all should be of great benefit to cellists.

Great credit is due to Mr.


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Lev Aronson, not only for extracting a practical digest from these volumes but also for amplifying Professor Matz's analysis of each successive problem through detailed explanations and much new material of his own devising. Aronson has divided this digest into seven progressive parts, placing each chapter into its proper niche in the logical continuity of development from open strings to virtuoso technique. His translations are clear and concise and the text has gained much through his own erudition and experience.

This book should tain it will take its be welcomed by every student and teacher. I am cer- place among the finest in its field. To be played in the designated position until the horizontal line stops. Bowing Indications : arco - To be played with the bow. V nv up bow in which the how arm is moved towards and across the body horizontally towards the left. To be practiced with up and down bowings. To be successively practiced on all four strings. To pluck a string with the fingers of the right hand.

This technique is useful for percus- sive attacks in slow tempi. The purpose of this procedure is to develop muscular strength, finger alert- ness and clarity of response in running pas- sages where the fingers will have to fall in an absolutely metronomical rhythm. In play- ing cantilena passages, the approach is dif- ferent: one finger takes over from the pre- vious one in a legato motion.

Parts of the Bow: or or or L 1 1 2 1 4 1 3 To be played at the frog. To be played with the middle of the bow. To be played with the tip of the bow. To be played with the whole bow.

To be played with one-half of the bow. To be played with one-quarter of the bow. To be played with one-eighth of the bow. Some Combinations of the Previous Sign and dumber Symbols: 1 2 1 4 To be played with the lower half of the bow. To be played with the fourth of the bow about its middle. This procedure can be used to anticipate the production of percussion tones by other fingers. The finger specified in that portion of the box offset to the right here, ,l l H joins the other specified fingers here, M 2, 3, 4" on the string as soon as possible. II are placed simultaneously upon the string specified to their left, A string symbol con- trols all specified fingers to its right and in downward listing until the next string sym- bol appears below it.

The lowest finger in the box is placed on the string specified by the symbol to its left outside the box; similarly, the other fingers EH- The finger specified in the box at the begin- ning of the horizontal line remains on a spec- ified string for the duration of that line and until the arrowhead terminates it. This action is particularly useful in changes from closed to open positions where the "feel" for accurate stretch and position changes is first developed. This technique is generally used in the higher positions because of the smaller distances between any two tones, where it contributes to the legato feeling be- tween notes.

However, it can also be used in the lower positions to facilitate movement across strings, in four-note patterns, or in octaves; in the latter, the thumb position on the fingerboard is also used. Position of the bow at the point Position at the frog B, Correct Playing Position 4 Something should be said at this point about the correct playing po- sition of the cello, the correct position of the shoulder, the arm, the hand and the fingers, the grasp of the bow and the balance of the bow, as well as the position of the left hand on che cello neck.

Positioning the Cello: The basic position of the cello should be as it was before the end pin was invented. The natural way to position the cello is to take the cello between the knees and slide the end pin down until it touches the floor. The correct position of the instrument will determine the correct position of both hands and arms, which will be like the two flexible wings of a bird. The direction of the bow will then determine the lie of the hand.

Grasping the Bow: The correct grasp of the bow can be obtained in this manner. Palm down, oppose the thumb and middle finger of the right hand so that they just touch. These fingers can now be worked in and out at the first joint so that their joined tips seem like the head of a striking snake. With the bow tip towards the student's left, the frog of the bow can now be introduced between them in such a manner that the frog is held at the little hill on its curve with the right side of the thumb between the nail and the flesh. It will be found that the bow can be held perfectly balanced in this manner by just these two fingers.

Now, the third and fourth fingers should be placed next to the mid- dle one on the frog. The hand should then be revolved about the wrist so that the bow tip makes a half circle from the left to the right side of the student and the palm of the hand is facing upward. To insure the bow from falling, the first finger is then placed on the frog ''lightly apart" from the others and subtly arched.

The fingers at this point will be seen to be in "respectful relation" to each other - that is, with equal grasping weight. The hand is then revolved back to its original downward facing po- sition, the wrist is raised a bit, the forearm is turned to the left and the weight of the bow is applied against the string. As the student guides the bow by alternately pushing and pulling it with the finger tips, it will be seen that the position of the thumb gradually changes. In a down bow, the thumb becomes almost straight with its ball opposed to that of the middle finger.

In an up bow, the thumb gradually approaches its starting position where its tip again comes into opposition to that of the middle finger. The purpose of the fingers on the frog is not only to hold the bow. Since only the finger tips touch the frog, the fingers remain free enough to perform another important duty: they control the bow. To repeat, in down bow, the finger tips pull the bow; in up bow, they push.

Thus, the finger tips "play" the bow, as one would "play" a fishing rod, so that the bow becomes a "live" instrument in the student's hand.

Introducing The Positions For Cello, Volume 2 - Second, 2-1/2, Third, 3-1/2

He controls it, directs it, manipulates it, channels its movement and works in tan- dem with it. Thus, one could say that there are two instruments involved in playing the cello: the cello and the bow. Again, the opposing fingers can be freely worked in and out. The upper arm is then raised a bit away from the body. Using the elbow as a fulcrum, the hand in its opposed finger placement can be swung in an arc so that the finger tips just touch the student r s mouth. Now, move the forearm back half the length of the arc, turn it slightly to the left, slightly arch the wrist, and insert the cello neck between the opposing fingers so than only the finger tips couch the strings.

When correctly placed, the fin- gers appear on che D string in a subtly curved manner and at a proper dis- tance from each other the teacher should demonstrate this to the pupil. The student will find that the left corner of the thumb as it leans against the back of the cello neck is naturally opposed to the middle fin- ger. What should occur as the hand moves up and down the fingerboard is a free action of the fingers rather than a convulsive grip.

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The thumb should never be used to give additional support to the fingers above it by pressing against the neck. Rather, the fingers should always move from a concentration of power whose "focus 0 is through the knuckles of the hand in a direct line to the fingerboard. Everything about the hand revolves around this center of power. Everything is concentration of power and of sound, if power is felt to go through the hand in this way, the hand will more naturally fall into its correct lie.

They always support each other. Finger 1 is supported by the thumb, finger 2 is supported by 1, etc. From the beginning, the student should also imagine and feel that each note has its own distinct place in the fingerboard. The board should not be a blank plane but should be thought of as having holes in it for each tone - and the fingers should be able to fit exactly into each one. Such a procedure will rapidly develop a rapport between the student and his instrument. How to Practice Organized practicing is the first step to success. The student should first approach the actual physical side of practice constructively and intelligently.

He should remember that tension is as much the hin- drance to progress and the cause of discord as the free and dynamic coor- dination of all performing elements is its helpmeet. Thus, the ideal con- ditions for performance are complete relaxation of the body in tandem with alertness in the fingers of both hands. The other part of organized practicing is an imaginative approach to all musical problems. The student should study technique analytically and should know ahead of performance what he wants to say and how he wants to say it. Watch list is full. This amount is subject to change until you make payment.

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INTRODUCING THE POSITIONS for VIOLIN Vol. 1 3rd & 5th POSITIONS by WHISTLER - $ | PicClick

Seller assumes all responsibility for this listing. Item specifics Condition: Brand New: A new, unread, unused book in perfect condition with no missing or damaged pages. See all condition definitions - opens in a new window or tab Read more about the condition. Sheet Music. Position playing allows players to extend range beyond the basics and move into the ranks of intermediate and advanced ensemble groups. The most important positions vary for each instrument, and Whistler wisely introduces the most-used positions first in Volume 1, followed by the next most important in Volume 2.

An irreplaceable component for every string student's training! Shipping and handling. This item will ship to Germany , but the seller has not specified shipping options.

Introducing the Positions for Cello: Volume 2 - Second, 2-1/2, Third, 3-1/2 Introducing the Positions for Cello: Volume 2 - Second, 2-1/2, Third, 3-1/2
Introducing the Positions for Cello: Volume 2 - Second, 2-1/2, Third, 3-1/2 Introducing the Positions for Cello: Volume 2 - Second, 2-1/2, Third, 3-1/2
Introducing the Positions for Cello: Volume 2 - Second, 2-1/2, Third, 3-1/2 Introducing the Positions for Cello: Volume 2 - Second, 2-1/2, Third, 3-1/2
Introducing the Positions for Cello: Volume 2 - Second, 2-1/2, Third, 3-1/2 Introducing the Positions for Cello: Volume 2 - Second, 2-1/2, Third, 3-1/2
Introducing the Positions for Cello: Volume 2 - Second, 2-1/2, Third, 3-1/2 Introducing the Positions for Cello: Volume 2 - Second, 2-1/2, Third, 3-1/2
Introducing the Positions for Cello: Volume 2 - Second, 2-1/2, Third, 3-1/2 Introducing the Positions for Cello: Volume 2 - Second, 2-1/2, Third, 3-1/2
Introducing the Positions for Cello: Volume 2 - Second, 2-1/2, Third, 3-1/2 Introducing the Positions for Cello: Volume 2 - Second, 2-1/2, Third, 3-1/2
Introducing the Positions for Cello: Volume 2 - Second, 2-1/2, Third, 3-1/2 Introducing the Positions for Cello: Volume 2 - Second, 2-1/2, Third, 3-1/2

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